Yes, we’ve calculated the physics of bending an iPhone in your skinny jeans.

MORE.

(Source: Wired)

These old-school NASA photos are just like your family snapshots… except in space!

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(Source: Wired)

Few animals are quite so human in their expression as dogs. If you doubt that at all, check out this gallery of canines being bathed.

(Source: Wired)

For its first-ever exhibit, Instagram’s editorial team has culled photos from its creative community. 

Also, it’s free.

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(Source: Wired)

We have figured out the rules of creating sleek sophistication. We know, more or less, how to get it right. Now, we need a shift in perspective that allows us to move forward. We need a pole right through a horse’s head. We need to enter the third stage of this cycle. It’s time to stop figuring out how to do things the right way, and start getting it wrong.

Read more from Why Getting It Wrong Is the Future of Design, by WIRED’s Editor-in-chief Scott Dadich.

(Source: Wired)

From the tar sands of Alberta to the soda ash in Kenya’s Lake Magadi, the pictures are mesmerizing to see but terrible to consider. The subjects are, literally and figuratively, huge. They also tend to be remote, or entirely off-limits. 

MORE: Sublime Yet Troubling Aerial Photos of Humanity’s Environmental Destruction

(Source: Wired)

Oh my.

npr:

wnyc:

The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.

http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

This is for all of the marine biologists/history buffs out there. -Emily

For our September issue, photographer Emily Shur took some awesome shots of comedians Jonah Ray and Kumail Nanjiani. Not all of them could fit into the magazine, but we want you to see them anyway because, well, they’re just that rad.

Click here to see more outtakes from this shoot.

And read the full piece: Two Comedians (And Totally Unqualified Critics) Preview the New TV Season

(Source: Wired)

It’s as disturbing as it sounds.

The new arcade game Sailor Zombie is another iteration of the ubiquitous transmedia empire known as AKB48, a group of 48 young women singing pop songs in schoolgirl outfits. Its members are ubiquitous in Japanese advertising, appear on television programs every day of the week, and star in their own videogames. AKB48 games traditionally have been dating simulators marketed toward male fans or music games aimed at children, but Sailor Zombie is a shooter in which the girls are your targets.

MORESailor Zombie Lets You Shoot Undead Japanese Pop Stars

(Source: Wired)

Christopher Columbus likely used this map as he planned his first voyage across the Atlantic in 1492 — and a team of researchers is using multispectral imaging to uncover the hidden text. 

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(Source: Wired)