Look at all those subway stops! No, it’s not NYC. This is what  L.A. could look like…

If you live in a city and take public transit, you’ve probably looked at the system map and thought to yourself, “I wish this thing went everywhere.”

You’re not alone. There’s a whole bunch of daydreamers just like you who’ve considered the additional subway lines, bus routes, and train tracks it would take to bring more people to more places. Some of them have even mapped these ideas out. The internet is full of these fantasy transit maps, where professional transit planners and dedicated amateurs alike imagine how public transit in our cities could look.

[MORE: 13 Fake Public Transit Systems We Wish Existed]

  1. chloeoryan12 reblogged this from latimes and added:
    One day
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  8. amirshirazi reblogged this from reachlax and added:
    Check yourself, the Muni Metro and Bart basically cover that entire SF map. Additionally, the Muni Metro is expanding...
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  10. flakingit reblogged this from piratetreasure and added:
    I wish
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