Our Space Photo of the Day is glorious.

This thin, glowing streak of a galaxy may look lonely, but it’s got a companion galaxy just beyond the frame.

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(Source: Wired)

It took 16 years and data from four orbiting spacecraft to assemble, but the U.S. Geological Survey’s new map of Mars is awesome.

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(Source: Wired)

Soon, it will be possible to buy a ticket to the Earth’s atmosphere. 

Lesser known than Elon Musk and Richard Bronson’s space tourism exploits is World View, a luxury flight capsule that, in an estimated four years, will start taking travelers on five hour tours through our earth’s atmosphere.

Do we really have to wait that long?!

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(Source: Wired)

A psychedelic gravity map of the lunar surface?

Yes, please.

(Source: Wired)

A modern-day Van Gogh!

Last spring Vincent Brady sold most of his belongings, moved out of his apartment and struck out on the road to document the night sky. But instead of taking your typical long-exposure shots, Brady designed himself a custom camera rig that’s allowed him to capture stunning 360 panoramic images of the stars and Milky Way moving in concert. 

MORE9 Stunning Panoramas of Starry Skies, Captured With a Homemade Camera Rig

(Source: Wired)

nevver:

Voyager Tom Gauld

We’ve all been there.

Scientists have discovered a new exoplanet that could be Earth’s cousin (or something like that).

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(Source: Wired)

Words can’t convey the awesomeness of this panorama.

[MORE: Space Photo of the Day]

(Source: Wired)

From the clean rooms where satellites are built to the Rubik’s cube a European astronaut carried into space, Edgar Martins’s photo series Rehearsal of Space is a vast photographic chronicling of the facilities, programs, and technology used by the European Space Agency and its affiliates.

Martins has taken great pains to make the photos more than just documentary. They’re meant to ignite the imagination, like a good sci-fi movie. His task was to imbue inanimate objects with meaning in a larger statement about humanity’s interest in space. He also wanted to convey the dazzling complexity and breadth of a space agency’s operations.

“My focus from the very beginning was to try to bring an audience that wouldn’t normally have access to the ESA facilities or ESA culture or their programs,” he says, “and because of that I needed to find an approach that really went beyond the traditional documentary approach.”

[MORE: Striking Photos Go Deep Inside the European Space Program]

(Source: Wired)