AUSTIN, Texas — What will comic books look like in the future? It’s difficult to say whether anyone knows the answer to that question yet, but Marvel Entertainment continues to explore the possibilities — and reach out to new readers — with a three-pronged digital initiative it announced at SXSW.

Until late Tuesday night, you can download 700 different #1 comics for free as digital issues in the Marvel Comics app. 

UPDATE: The launch has been delayed. The massive consumer demand for the free comics has melted down the servers operated by digital comics distributer ComiXology, and the company is working to try to restore service. “We don’t like letting you down,” ComiXology co-founder and CEO David Steinberger said in a blog post Monday. “We’re pausing the Marvel Comics #1 promotion for the time being. For those of you that want to take advantage of the offer – you will get your comics!” Steinberger urges those who still want to take part to enter an e-mail address into a web form so the company can send an update when the promotion is available again.

[More here.]

(Source: Wired)

This new app turns your smartphone into a mobile urine lab.

Don’t worry, it doesn’t involve soaking your precious handset - but you will have to pee in a cup.

(Source: Wired)

Vine will have its Tahrir Square moment, and soon. It is destined to be a horrifying window that opens on a violent, capricious world, and to loop it back upon itself. And when celebrities flock to it — as they already are — it will almost certainly one day document the precious real-time birth of our newest Kardashian, on repeat, again and again.

Here’s why Vine is gonna be huge.

(Source: Wired)

Facebook bigwig Justin Osofsky presented Facebook’s take on the “blocking Vine from accessing Facebook friends” situation without directly referencing Vine. Or even making much sense. His explanation, posted in a blog post Friday, pointed to violations in Facebook’s Platform Policy.

Oddly, the policies he referred to in the blog post don’t seem to address why Vine’s access to your Facebook friends has been blocked. Instead it seems that Vine has become another victim in the proxy war between Facebook and Twitter.

The kerfuffle started late Thursday when people using Vine, Twitter’s cool six-second video application,  discovered that Facebook had seemingly blocked the ability to find and add Facebook friends with Vine accounts. Instead of adding your great aunt’s Vine account to your feed, you got a dialog box telling you, “Vine is not authorized to make this Facebook request.” Osofsky, director of platform partnerships and operations, noted Friday in his post that a majority of apps on the Facebook platform give people an easy way to share what they are doing in their apps and give feeds a personalized feel.

Read more @ Gadget Lab!

(Source: Wired)

There are millions of apps out there, and some of them are actually useful.

2012 was an especially busy year for developers, who churned out roughly eleventy-billion apps, including a few for Windows phones. We saw the rise and rise of Instagram, the short-lived Draw Something fad and the inauguration of presidential campaign apps.

We’ve already run down the essential apps — 413 essential apps, to be exact — and now, as the year has wound down, we run down the most memorable.

Check them out here, and tell us how much you disagree with us!

Bribery, porn and spam are the path to riches in the app world.

[Photo: jkr_photo/Flickr]

(Source: Wired)

[via wiredinsider]:

Image via WIRED

I don’t think it’s a stretch to say that most of us value the maps function of our smartphones as much or more so than the ability to make and receive phone calls. That’s what makes this piece of news from Gadget Lab (via 9to5Mac) so interesting: apparently Apple’s going…

Got it installed yet? You know who we are. Follow us! @wired

(Source: Wired)

Thanks for the Date. Would You Care to Participate in my Customer Survey?

WotWentWrong is an app to request and provide feedback for dates without engaging in actual interpersonal communication. Then again, if we were better at interpersonal communication, we might not need WotWentWrong.

Photo: Flickr/Ed Yourdon