John Pound lives in Eureka, California. He’s either 62 or 63—he can’t remember at the moment—and he’s been a cartoonist his whole life. The first half of his career was traditional, insofar as any career in weirdo art and underground comics can be traditional. He sketched and inked and colored by hand. He made the annual pilgrimage to Comic-Con, back in the days when it was still concerned with comics. In 1984, he collaborated with comics legend Art Spiegelman on the first run of Garbage Pail Kids cards for Topps, painting 40 gross characters in 40 exhausting days.

But in the late 1980s, the purchase of his first computer, an Amiga, set Pound’s artistic pursuits on a slightly different course. He started checking out other people’s computer art and got to wondering what his new machine could do for a cartoonist. Eventually, he became smitten with the idea of creating a program that could automatically generate comics for him. The dream has kept him busy for the better part of three decades. Today, he’s generating striking, randomly generated compositions by the hundreds, none of which look anything like what the art we’ve come to expect from computer code.

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Pro tip: John Pound is on Tumblr. Go follow him immediately.

Do it.

Now.

99percentinvisible:

Artist Allison Greenwald took digits from her personal information, overlapped them, extracted the counter forms created between them, and then laser cut the resulting shapes. 

Pretty legit way to visualize a single person’s identity through datapoints.

Her work was an obvious choice for the cover of WIRED’s August issue, which explores how the smartphone has sparked an explosion in creativity. 

Photographer Sara Cwynar focuses on this transformation with her complex compositions, which show every photograph has an arc. The moment the photo captures might be frozen in time, but the world around that moment moves forward and inevitably changes the meaning.

MORE: Turning Garbage Into Art Is This Photographer’s Life’s Work

(Source: Wired)

We’ve said it before: There’s a strange beauty to computer viruses (especially the old-school DOS variety). And their backstories are even better.

MORE11 Trippy Illustrations of History’s Most Infamous Computer Viruses

(Source: Wired)

These creations could pass as concept art for the Tomorrowland section of Disney’s theme parks. 

It’s difficult for anyone to imagine the future. But what if you were largely unfamiliar with the present?

That’s the fascination at the heart of “Commissions for Utopia,” a series of futuristic scenes of North Korea dreamed up by one of the country’s promising young architects. 

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(Source: Wired)

Yes, that’s paper.

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(Source: Wired)

A modern-day Van Gogh!

Last spring Vincent Brady sold most of his belongings, moved out of his apartment and struck out on the road to document the night sky. But instead of taking your typical long-exposure shots, Brady designed himself a custom camera rig that’s allowed him to capture stunning 360 panoramic images of the stars and Milky Way moving in concert. 

MORE9 Stunning Panoramas of Starry Skies, Captured With a Homemade Camera Rig

(Source: Wired)

While the geometric style certainly owes a debt to the pixilated world of Pac Man and Space Invaders, the way the image is captured is decidedly old-school: brush on paper.

MORE: Ron Burgundy and Boba Fett, Rendered in 3-D Printed Pixels

(Source: Wired)

Traveling between villages in the Russian republic of Udmurtia, photographer Lucia Ganieva discovered an intriguing trend. Almost every home she visited was decorated with brilliant wallpaper depicting lush nature scenes. 

See the gaudy wallpapers that provide rural Russians with a taste of the outside world.

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(Source: Wired)

Of all the places you’d expect to find a bespoke typeface, the website of an elementary school probably isn’t one of them. And yet, if you go to Castledown Primary School’s home page you’ll see a friendly, sans-serif font created specifically for the East Sussex, England school.

When Castledown headmaster Neil Small commissioned London design studio Colophon Foundry, he had a big ask: Could the designers come up with a typeface that not only looked good, but improved students’ reading and writing skills, too?

[MORE: A Custom Font That Helps Kids Learn to Read and Write]

(Source: Wired)