The set draws from two distinct but related sources: the hollow-body resophonic guitars that National String Instrument Corp. began manufacturing in the late ’20s, and the RCA Victor Special Model K, the portable electric phonograph John Vassos designed in the early ’30s. Despite the changes, though, Blackwood says the overarching purpose was to give Paramount a treatment on par with the label’s role in early American music. “Our guiding question was what would Paramount have done if they gave a shit—which they didn’t—and had the money that one of their more well-heeled rival had like RCA Victor had? What would things have looked like?”

MOREJack White Just Curated the Ultimate Box Set of Iconic American Music

We’ve got space-age beats and hip-hop supergroups in this week’s playlist.

Keep the recommendations coming.

MORE.

(Source: Wired)

Steve Aoki talks with famed futurist Ray Kurzweil about how technology will shape our future, in terms of creativity, consciousness, and the coming singularity.

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(Source: Wired)

It’s as disturbing as it sounds.

The new arcade game Sailor Zombie is another iteration of the ubiquitous transmedia empire known as AKB48, a group of 48 young women singing pop songs in schoolgirl outfits. Its members are ubiquitous in Japanese advertising, appear on television programs every day of the week, and star in their own videogames. AKB48 games traditionally have been dating simulators marketed toward male fans or music games aimed at children, but Sailor Zombie is a shooter in which the girls are your targets.

MORESailor Zombie Lets You Shoot Undead Japanese Pop Stars

(Source: Wired)

Sennheiser’s new Urbanite headphones are a bass-forward model made to sound just like the dance club.

Sound familiar? 

MORE.

Glen E. Friedman is responsible for many of the most iconic portraits of hip-hop, punk, and skating legends taken in the ‘80s and ‘90s. The best of these photos has been compiled in a new anthology called My Rules.

See more of Friedman’s shots of Ice-T, Henry Rollins, and Tony Hawk here.

(Source: Wired)

In partnership with RapGenius, this guy analyzed the vocabularies of noted wordsmiths William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, and Lil Wayne. 

Aesop Rock is so verbose he had to modify the X-axis to fit him on.

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(Source: Wired)

Now that’s how we want to do a music festival.

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(Source: Wired)

Some of the greatest bands in history weren’t real bands at all. But that doesn’t mean we can’t do right by the music they’ve left us!

In that spirit, Father/Daughter Records is releasing Faux Real, a Record Store Day compilation of up-and-coming artists like Body Parts, Field Mouse, and Speedy Ortiz’s Sadie Dupuis performing some of the best songs by fake bands. One favorite is a standout for fans of late-’90s MTV animation: “Ow! My Face” by Mystik Spiral, Trent Lane‘s band on Daria.

Have a listen.

(Source: Wired)

After last week’s deluge of playlists from Questlove and KCRW, we turned our attention back to you guys—and you didn’t disappoint. Things got a little more upbeat this week, thanks in no small part to new albums from St. Vincent and Kendrick Lamar’s compatriot Schoolboy Q. (Also, in Beyonce-like fashion, Kid Cudi dropped a surprise iTunes bomb on everyone the other night, so you know we had to throw something from that in.) As usual, we’ve added the tracks to our ongoing Spotify playlist of great new music, as well as creating a standalone YouTube playlist for this week. Keep the recommendations coming, people.

So listen up: we’ve got your sensational weekend playlist right here.