Glen E. Friedman is responsible for many of the most iconic portraits of hip-hop, punk, and skating legends taken in the ‘80s and ‘90s. The best of these photos has been compiled in a new anthology called My Rules.

See more of Friedman’s shots of Ice-T, Henry Rollins, and Tony Hawk here.

(Source: Wired)

These gorgeous aerial shots of Miami’s and New York’s beaches were taken while hanging from a helicopter.

The colors and patterns of the umbrellas reveal which beaches are public and which are private. 

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(Source: Wired)

The Jenny, the little plane that could.

As popular as the plane was with the Army, the Jenny came into her own after the war. The government sold hundreds of surplus JN-4s, some of them still in their shipping containers, to anyone with $300 (about $4,130 today), says Jeffery S. Underwood, a historian at the United States Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. The plane proved especially adept at barnstorming, becoming the most popular aircraft used in that daring sport. Thousands of pilots learned to fly in a Jenny, including Amelia Earhart.

MOREThe Humble WWI Biplane That Helped Launch Commercial Flight

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“I don’t use cages—I’ve been surrounded by 150 to 200 sharks, not once ever been been close to being bitten.”

…WHAT?

MORE: A Photographer Puts You Face-to-Face With Sharks, by Swimming Uncaged

(Source: Wired)

Her work was an obvious choice for the cover of WIRED’s August issue, which explores how the smartphone has sparked an explosion in creativity. 

Photographer Sara Cwynar focuses on this transformation with her complex compositions, which show every photograph has an arc. The moment the photo captures might be frozen in time, but the world around that moment moves forward and inevitably changes the meaning.

MORE: Turning Garbage Into Art Is This Photographer’s Life’s Work

(Source: Wired)

Judging from your Twitter feed, Comic-Con is nothing but surprise movie trailers (Interstellar!), celebrity sightings (Hulk Hogan!), and the most elaborate cosplay and promotional stunts (zombie attacks!). But the average attendee—that tried and true fan who comes back year after year—isn’t necessarily the one camping overnight for a Hall H seat or hauling around a 50-lb photon pack. We took some time this year to talk to the every-fan, and to find out what keeps folks coming back, even as the Con grows bigger and more insane.

Photos by Ben Rasmussen/WIRED

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(Source: Wired)

The Arthur Kill ship graveyard was never meant to become such a decrepit spectacle. In the years following World War II, the adjacent scrapyard began to purchase scores of outdated vessels, with the intention of harvesting them for anything of value. But the shipbreakers couldn’t keep pace with the influx of boats, especially once people started to use the graveyard as a dumping ground for their old dinghies. Plenty of ships fell into such disrepair that they were no longer worth the effort to strip, especially since many teem with toxic substances. And so they’ve been left to rot in the murky tidal strait that divides Staten Island from New Jersey, where they’ve turned scarlet with rust and now host entire ecosystems of hardy aquatic creatures.

MORE: The Secret NYC Graveyard Where Ships Go to Die

(Source: Wired)

Gorgeous photos of bees, up close and personal.

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Being a street photographer is a bit like conducting a drunk symphony: You must make order of chaos. Only a few photographers do it well, and many of them appear in Cheryl Dunn’s film, Everybody Street, which chronicles the street photography of New York City.

MORE: New Film Profiles NYC’s Greatest Street Photographers

(Source: Wired)

A modern-day Van Gogh!

Last spring Vincent Brady sold most of his belongings, moved out of his apartment and struck out on the road to document the night sky. But instead of taking your typical long-exposure shots, Brady designed himself a custom camera rig that’s allowed him to capture stunning 360 panoramic images of the stars and Milky Way moving in concert. 

MORE9 Stunning Panoramas of Starry Skies, Captured With a Homemade Camera Rig

(Source: Wired)