Judging from your Twitter feed, Comic-Con is nothing but surprise movie trailers (Interstellar!), celebrity sightings (Hulk Hogan!), and the most elaborate cosplay and promotional stunts (zombie attacks!). But the average attendee—that tried and true fan who comes back year after year—isn’t necessarily the one camping overnight for a Hall H seat or hauling around a 50-lb photon pack. We took some time this year to talk to the every-fan, and to find out what keeps folks coming back, even as the Con grows bigger and more insane.

Photos by Ben Rasmussen/WIRED

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The Arthur Kill ship graveyard was never meant to become such a decrepit spectacle. In the years following World War II, the adjacent scrapyard began to purchase scores of outdated vessels, with the intention of harvesting them for anything of value. But the shipbreakers couldn’t keep pace with the influx of boats, especially once people started to use the graveyard as a dumping ground for their old dinghies. Plenty of ships fell into such disrepair that they were no longer worth the effort to strip, especially since many teem with toxic substances. And so they’ve been left to rot in the murky tidal strait that divides Staten Island from New Jersey, where they’ve turned scarlet with rust and now host entire ecosystems of hardy aquatic creatures.

MORE: The Secret NYC Graveyard Where Ships Go to Die

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Gorgeous photos of bees, up close and personal.

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Being a street photographer is a bit like conducting a drunk symphony: You must make order of chaos. Only a few photographers do it well, and many of them appear in Cheryl Dunn’s film, Everybody Street, which chronicles the street photography of New York City.

MORE: New Film Profiles NYC’s Greatest Street Photographers

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A modern-day Van Gogh!

Last spring Vincent Brady sold most of his belongings, moved out of his apartment and struck out on the road to document the night sky. But instead of taking your typical long-exposure shots, Brady designed himself a custom camera rig that’s allowed him to capture stunning 360 panoramic images of the stars and Milky Way moving in concert. 

MORE9 Stunning Panoramas of Starry Skies, Captured With a Homemade Camera Rig

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Using the camera’s face-tracking input, you can look around onscreen objects, even peer behind them. 

MOREEverything You Need to Know About Amazon’s New Fire Phone

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Traveling between villages in the Russian republic of Udmurtia, photographer Lucia Ganieva discovered an intriguing trend. Almost every home she visited was decorated with brilliant wallpaper depicting lush nature scenes. 

See the gaudy wallpapers that provide rural Russians with a taste of the outside world.

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Today, Instagram is releasing the first big upgrade to its photo filters since the app was launched. But this doesn’t mean new filter’s. 

The real craft of it lies in the details. 

[MOREInstagram Finally Unveils New and Improved Photo Filters]

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One spring day in 1894, Thomas Edison unveiled a remarkable moving picture machine called the Kinetoscope in a Manhattan parlor. Some 500 people lined up to drop quarters into what was the Oculus Rift of its day—a look into something truly transformative.

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No, these aren’t aerial shots.

They’re human tears under a microscope.

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(Source: Wired)