Four tech giants embroiled in the government’s secret PRISM collection program reported today that they had received classified national security demands for the contents of at least 59,000 user accounts during the first half of 2013.

In the wake of a legal battle to provide more transparency about the number of government national security requests they receive for customer information, Yahoo reported that between January and June last year, the government sought content for between 30,000 and 40,000 user accounts, mostly using classified court orders from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Google reported that it received FISC requests for content on between 9,000 and 10,000 accounts during the same period.

[MORE: In Just 6 Months, the NSA Spied on More Than 59,000 Accounts]

(Source: Wired)

After a three-year legal battle and months-long trial, former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning was found not guilty on the most serious charge he faced — aiding the enemy.

Col. Denise Lind, however, found him guilty of five other counts for violating the Espionage Act and five counts of theft.

The judge rejected the government’s argument that Manning, simply by the nature of his training as an Army intelligence officer, had to assume that the information he leaked would likely reach Al Qaeda operatives. But she ruled that Manning did have reason to believe that the leaks would harm the U.S., even if that was not his intention.

The acquittal on the aiding the enemy charge is being viewed by many as a victory.

[MORE]

The Department of Homeland Security’s civil rights watchdog has concluded that “intuition and hunch” are among the primary reasons why it is “inadvisable” to establish constitutional safeguards protecting travelers’ electronics from being searched for any reason along the U.S. border.

[MORE]


(Source: Wired)

A Virginia man who wrote an abbreviated version of the Fourth Amendment on his body and stripped to his shorts at an airport security screening area won a trial Friday in his lawsuit seeking $250,000 in damages for being detained on a disorderly conduct charge.

[via Threat Level]


…hooray for America?

(Source: Wired)

Even casual divers know that diving too deep, or surfacing too quickly, can cause a host of complications from sickness to seizures and even sudden death. Now the Pentagon’s scientists want to build gear that can turn commandos into Aquaman, allowing them to plunge into the deeps without having to worry as much about getting ill. (Orange and green tights sold separately.)

According to a list of research proposals from the U.S. military’s blue-sky researchers at Darpa, the agency is seeking “integrated microsystems” to detect and control “warfighter physiology for military diver operations.” Essentially it comes down to hooking divers up to sensors that can read both their bio-physical signs and the presence of gases like nitric oxide, which help prevent decompression sickness, commonly known as “the bends.” If those levels dip too low, the Darpa devices will send small amounts of the gases into divers’ lungs to help keep them swimming.

More @ Danger Room!

(Source: Wired)

Top-secret janitor. Pollster to the spies. Classified comic book artist. Any organization sufficiently large is bound to have the odd job opening within it. But few organizations are as freakin’ colossal as the U.S. military intelligence industrial complex, with an estimated 4.9 million Americans holding security clearances today. Which means there are thousands of unconventional positions to fill at any given moment.

Here are some of the wilder military and intelligence “help wanted” ads we found online. Some classifieds are for truly wacky jobs. Others are for slightly more standard positions — but presented in an odd way.

(Source: Wired)

It’s becoming the trademark move of failing regimes: silence your critics and cripple their communications by cutting off the internet. Libya did it. Egypt too. And last week, Syria pulled the plug on its own internet system.

According to new research from network monitoring company Renesys, it could just as easily happen in many other countries too, including Greenland, Yemen, and Ethiopia. Sixty-one of the world’s countries have just one or two service providers connecting them to the rest of the internet.

(Source: Wired)

How a Google headhunter’s e-mail unraveled a massive net security hole.

(Source: Wired)

Business iPad users beware. Your halcyon days of loading whatever the heck you want onto your tablet may be coming to an end.

Apple is set to introduce a couple of new features that will give corporate IT new ways to lock down the iOS 6 operating system, which powers the iPad and the iPhone, according to Zenprise, a mobile device management company that was briefed on the features by Apple.

More @ Wired Enterprise.

(Source: Wired)

Cosmo is huge — 6 foot 7 and 220 pounds the last time he was weighed, at a detention facility in Long Beach, California on June 26. And yet he’s getting bigger, because Cosmo — also known as Cosmo the God, the social-engineering mastermind who weaseled his way past security systems at Amazon, Apple, AT&T, PayPal, AOL, Netflix, Network Solutions, and Microsoft — is just 15 years old.

He turns 16 next March, and he may very well do so inside a prison cell.

Read more from Cosmo, the Hacker ‘God’ Who Fell to Earth over @ Gadget Lab.

(Source: Wired)